Maths for Games - A Fresh Start for Mathematics


#41

Didn’t Ben have a Game Physics course? It doesn’t seem to be on Udemy anymore but it sounded like what we need and would involve the maths too. I voted for this potential Maths course but I would prefer it to be a combined Maths and Physics course which are interconnected with each other anyway…but question is, do we want it Unity specific or just general? I don’t really know what is best tbh. But whatever is decided…I’m in!


#42

Totally agree with this.


#43

Thank you so much for sharing this resources.


#44

Creating a course or section for Math for games YES!!! and i think that to be a god game developer, one needs to know some Game Math. So yes, please create a course or section for math for games.


#45

This is the part that i struggle with. This would be a great help to me.


#46

1 more vote for “Maths for Games - A Fresh Start for Mathematics”. I would love to freshen my math skills - especially for gamedev. Totally agree with @sampattuzzi “The problem with school maths is that they never tell you why it’s useful.”


#47

I’ll vote for Maths for Games too!! I would definitely like to buy that class.


#48

Interesting discussion going on over on Facebook too: https://www.facebook.com/groups/completeunitydeveloper/permalink/2040552099534018/


#49

I can’t find the heart, but I’ll vote for this too!


#50

Start the course already!


#51

Great! Looking forward for this course to be published :slight_smile:


#52

I would do nasty things for this course! :yum:


#53

There’s great stuff out there for learning the math (“maths” for you British blokes) but I would love to see a course that brings the math together with the specifics of game design and development.


#54

The mathematics book is available as a pdf.


#55

Would definitely be interested in a maths focused course with immediate practical application as examples.


#56

I just created an account to vote for this. I’d sign up in a heartbeat.


#57

The way you guys teach concepts have been absolutely great for me, If you guys put out a maths for games course I would definitely take it. Thanks for the awesome content.


#58

@sampattuzzi @ben

Had a conversation on Discord today on maths and a few things have come to light in the courses that maths might be some of the issues people are getting witht he learning.

What sparked this was that my daughter was doing year 6 maths in year 5 because its more her level but they hit the SAT level and she moved back to the class with zero teaching on the subjects.

When presented with this it lost me entirely and i felt completely useless like i had failed my child.

DanM had the solution almost instantly but the discussion on explaining the topic that was presented was about an hour.

You guys can probably solve this instantly but i couldnt even work out what i was looking at and that was all the information she was given.


#59

I have probably learnt more math since having a child than I did when I was at school above. My son would refer to the above as the bus stop method, because the line looks like a bus shelter presumably.

The way my son was taught to tackle the bus stop method was as follows;

Use the number on the outside of the bus stop, and try to see how many times it will go into the first number on the right. If it won’t fit, use the first two numbers, if it won’t fit, use the first three numbers and so on.

So, in the above example;

9 doesn’t fit within 8, so we use the number to the right as well, giving us 88.
9 does fit into 88, 9 times (81), and leaves us with 7 left over.
This 7 is then written as a little seven at the top of and in front of the original 7, giving us 77.
9 does fit into 77, 8 times (72), and leaves us with 5 left over.

In the above, it looks like the example shows it being written on separate lines vertically, instead of the smaller number in front of the next number along the line (waiting passengers), but the principle is the same. When you get to the end of the line, what is left is the remainder.

Thus, 9 and 8, 98, with the 5 remainder.

For anyone else, if you don’t have a child yet, I highly recommend getting one, if for the math exercises alone. If you are still of school age, it might be better to wait a while and just listen in class - “just like what I didn’t.” - I could have done better in English also. :slight_smile:

I have previously bought some books by the same publisher to help my son at primary school, and again now at secondary school, the publisher is CGP and I highly recommend them (for any age). I myself have been working through the GCSE level book and have picked up a lot more than I did at school some *cough* 30 years ago, although that is probably down to a different attitude towards learning now.

Here’s a link to the specific book;

The primary school _emphasized text_aged ones are really good fun as they have some little comic-like characters in them and are actually quite funny to read. The secondary school level doesn’t have the little drawings, but explain the subject matter in a very easy to follow way and do sprinkle a little humour throughout still also.

In my case I bought the book to help my son and also myself, equations were something I could not recall very well at all. Perhaps this may be useful whilst you wait for a specific course. :slight_smile:


#60

Thanks rob, I am sure this will help others as well as me remember.
I think its the layout thing that threw me as you say we are used to the little floating nubmer for the remainder not laid out vertically.
I was just blind to find the logic in the layout maybe i need some SAT sat papers too :smiley:
Got the kindle edition as well as all help.

Thanks again